Sino-British nature film to debut on Friday

Updated 2017-08-10 10:24:19 China Daily
The Sino-UK documentary Earth: One Amazing Day features 38 wild species from 22 countries, including white-headed langurs in China.

The Sino-UK documentary Earth: One Amazing Day features 38 wild species from 22 countries, including white-headed langurs in China.

First Sino-UK film after 2015 coproduction treaty is set for release in China.

Chinese director Fan Lixin found it challenging to work with animals in Earth: One Amazing Day.

British directors Richard Dale and Peter Webber and he have directed the nature film.

"They (the animals in the movie) are from remote areas where it is difficult to reach. But even after you've gone there, it's hard to find them," Fan says in a recent interview in Beijing.

As the first Sino-UK film after a coproduction treaty signed by the two countries in 2015, the 100-minute film has been produced by BBC Earth Films and SMG Pictures, a Shanghai company.

With a crew of some 100 from China and Britain, the film took 142 days of shooting and three years of editing from more than 12,000 DVDs that capture footage in the wild.

The film has stunning scenes, such as giraffes fighting for territory, millions of mayflies over a river and baby iguanas' thrilling escape from snakes.

As the sequel to BBC Earth Films' 2007 hit documentary Earth, the new film tracks the sun from the highest mountains to the remotest islands and exotic jungles over the course of a single day.

Narrated by American actor Robert Redford, the film features 38 wild species from 22 countries, including hummingbirds from the tropical forests of Ecuador to narwhals in the Arctic waters. China's giant pandas, white-headed langurs and red-crown cranes are in it, too.

Neil Nightingale, one of the producers, explains the animal selection.

"I think they each fulfill a very specific role in the film. The story is about 24 hours. We have the red-crown cranes at the very beginning, because it (the scene) is a wonderful evocation of dawn," says Nightingale, who is also the creative director of BBC Earth.

"Of course, we could not feature China without the giant panda. We were very lucky to film a mother and a cub. It's a beautiful, very charming sequence in the middle of the morning that relates back to bamboo growth and the sun," he adds.

But the biggest surprise for him and his colleagues was the white-headed langur, an endangered animal that lives in South China's Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region.

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